Acting Backwards by Elliott Kashner

elliott-kashner-headshotQuotidian Theatre welcomes Elliott Kashner, who will be playing the charismatic Father Flynn in QTC’s upcoming production of John Patrick Shanley’s Doubt: A Parable. Even though rehearsals have not yet begun, Elliott was asked to provide a few thoughts on his approach to taking on the enigmatic character.

“Brian O’Byrne and Cherry Jones used to joke about competing for the audience’s allegiances during their run in Doubt: A Parable. O’Byrne and Jones played Father Flynn and Sister Aloysius, the two characters whose conflict is the central focus of the play. The two ultimately compromised, estimating that they each probably had convinced roughly half of those who saw the show, with a handful in the middle who were uncertain. The good-natured ribbing between these two titans of theater revealed the delicate balancing act that is at the heart of performing Doubt. The title isn’t just a less-than-subtle hint at what the play’s theme might be; it is a directive for the actors.

“Flynn advocates for his own innocence throughout the play against Aloysius’ dogged pursuit of proving his guilt. The resulting effect of playing Flynn – and playing against him – must land somewhere between guilt and innocence. That means that the actor playing Flynn must start from viewing the character from the audience’s perspective, anticipate how that audience may perceive Flynn, and then work backward to make choices toward that effect. This is a bit different from how actors may approach acting in the world of realism. Acting realism tends to be a process of analyzing the text, making decisions about the character, playing those choices truthfully, and allowing audiences to draw their own conclusions. For Doubt, making Flynn appear neither wholly guilty or innocent places specific requirements on the character choices. Fortunately, the script gives the actor both a great deal of information about Flynn’s history and a variety of tools to obfuscate that history.

“Author John Patrick Shanley is rumored to have revealed the true backstory of Flynn to only two people: Brian O ‘Byrne and Phillip Seymour Hoffman, who played Flynn in the film adaptation. (Note: I do not recommend watching the film prior to seeing the play. Although the script was adapted for the screen by Shanley himself, the film makes several choices that may unduly bias your viewing of the play.) Knowing Shanley’s version of Flynn’s backstory may be more of a hindrance than a help. Rather than communicating that backstory, the actor’s job in this play is to hide it.

“But what about the second half of the title: A Parable. Why? Well, as Father Flynn says, “You make up little stories to illustrate. In the tradition of the parable… What actually happens in life is beyond interpretation.””

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Stevie Zimmerman to Direct QTC Production of Shanley’s Doubt: A Parable

steviezQTC welcomes Stevie Zimmerman who will direct John Patrick Shanley’s Doubt: A Parable opening on 7 April and playing weekends through 7 May.

Originally from London, England, Stevie received a B.A. at Oxford University and an M.A. in Directing from the University of Leeds. Stevie has lived in the U.S. since 1993, and in the D.C. area for 6 years.

Before moving to the D.C. area, Stevie lived in Connecticut, where she was an Associate Professor of Drama from 1999 to 2010 at the University of Hartford’s Hartt School of Music and Theatre. During this time, she also worked regularly with the Playhouse on Park in West Hartford, where she directed Collected Stories, Love Letters, Driving Miss Daisy, and, in 2016, Margaret Edson’s Wit.

After relocating to D.C., Stevie directed Andrew Lloyd Webber’s By Jeeves at 1st Stage. Glowing reviews, such as “Heroic performances bespeak a heroic director; this one is Stevie Zimmerman, prompted 1st Stage to invite Stevie to return to direct the area premiere of Billy Elliott writer Lee Hall’s The Pitmen Painters.

For Peter’s Alley Theatre Productions, Stevie directed David Lindsey Abaire’s Rabbit Hole and Donald Margulies’ Time Stands Still, which featured QTC actor Chelsea Mayo.

At the Theatre of the First Amendment, Stevie’s direction of a staged reading of Michael P. Smith’s world premiere play, Passaggio, led to her directing a full-scale production of Passaggio at George Mason University.

At the Capital Fringe, Stevie directed Alice – an evening with Alice Roosevelt Longworth as well as a revival of Our Lady of the Clouds. She has also directed staged readings for the Kennedy Center’s Page-to-Stage festival, the Doorway Arts Ensemble, Beltway Arts inter alia.

At the Wintergreen Performing Arts Festival in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Stevie directed Yasmina Reza’s Art and the English language premiere of Aristides Vargas’ Our Lady of the Clouds.

Please join us to see Stevie bring her personal touch to Doubt at the QTC!

DOUBT: A PARABLE by John Patrick Shanley (7 April – 7 May 2017)

TICKETS and other show information available HERE.official-qtc-banner-2016

Broadway World Review: Quotidian’s THE LADY WITH THE LITTLE DOG a Gorgeous Chamber Piece

IMG_5671Read the glowing review of the show by Chekhov scholar and reviewer Andrew White on Broadway World.

Here’s a sample that we really like…

“As Anna, Chekhov’s heroine, Chelsea Mayo captures the quiet desperation of a woman who has been taught her whole life to deny herself everything-and who genuinely struggles with the prospect of happiness, especially because it comes so furtively. She is romanced by the shore at Yalta by Dmitry, played here with relish by Ian Blackwell Rogers, an admitted roué but one who has found in Anna the soul-harbor he had sought for so many years. Their respective spouses are played here by pianist Roberts and violinist Kharazian; in keeping with the story’s conceit, both actors portray them as the very models of stale conformity, each creating an emotional void which Anna and Dmitri are desperate to escape.

“Guiding us gently through the story’s twists and turns is none other than Anton Chekhov himself, played with discretion and charm by David Dubov. One of Mumford’s most effective strokes here is to have Anton interact constantly with his characters, so that the tale is not so much an authorial fait accompli as matter of negotiation with the characters themselves.”

July 17th Performance of The Lady With the Little Dog Almost Sold Out

SOLD OUTReservations for this Sunday’s performance indicate that almost all seats are filled! If you wanted to see the play on Sunday, but haven’t reserved seats yet, please consider another performance.

Subscribers who wanted to attend the post-show talk on Sunday may want to consider going to the 23 July dramaturg session at 7 p.m., instead. It is one of the perks of being a QTC subscriber!